Exoworld.Info Q&A

/ author bio followed by faq \




About the site author:

     Although I'm not destined to be a scientist, I've had a love of all things technical since I was a kid. You'd find me dissecting a lineman's handset, or exploring boxes of electrical parts. One of the coolest techie things I saw as a kid was the inside of a central office at night full of blinking lights and droning hardware. I have my dad and brother to thank for introducing me to some of the first personal portable computers. My mid-80s elementary school math book actually had Basic programming directions. I was one of the few lucky kids that had a computer to program them with, before printing the patterns out through the snazzy dot matrix. Remember Pi? I never got any funny 216-string printouts though.

    I'm a graduate of Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio, with an associate in history and an associate in arts, and a minor in computer information systems-web development. I am also pursing an associate in modern languages and an associate in science at Sinclair. As well, I am enrolled as a senior at Wright State University, pursuing a bachelor in history and in liberal studies, and am returning to Sinclair to finish my Web Development degree.

    My main passions are music, art, and writing. Even though I'm not going to be one of the lucky ones pioneering in emerging technical disciplines, I still draw a lot of inspiration from science and history, and they show up in my creations. A night reading about quantum cascade lasers is a night well spent. Out of all the sciences, my favorite subjects are quantum mechanics, neuroscience, computer science, astronomy, and the history and philosophy of science, but no science is uninteresting. In the future I'd like to become better-versed in more complex mathematics.

     I had wanted to create a site like this for awhile. When the opportunity arose as an astronomy project in early 2009, I took it. I've compiled a good amount of information, so it should stand as a great resource to pique interest and create curiosity.

I hope it inspires you.



T. E. Hieatt . Oct 2011
- updated Mar 2014




Exoworld.Info Q&A

/ answers to site questions \




Who funds the site?

Who designed the site?

Why was this site created?

What is the purpose of this site?

Can I copy things from this site?

Why should anyone care about planets we can't go to?

You have something on this site that is copyrighted by me.

Something on this site is incorrect.
How do I contact you to fix it?


 
Who funds the site?

The site is funded by the site author. Donations are appreciated.

Support this site in two ways:

Use referral code "dmstudios" for 50% off a year of hosting + two week free trial. I've used DreamHost for many years. Excellent service and value. A referral credit is applied to Exoworld's hosting cost.

Give a donation directly through DreamHost via PayPal. DreamHost puts the money toward the hosting bill. I do not personally receive it.

Donate towards my web hosting bill!

You will be returned to this page after donation.


Who designed the site?

T. E. Hieatt of Degenerate Matter Studios. Please see the above bio.


Why was this site created?

That is answered in the above bio.


What is the purpose of this site?

The purpose of this site is to provide a non-technical resource that encourages the exploration of extrasolar planets and the emerging scientific frontiers that follow.


Can I copy things from this site?

See the usage policy.


Why should anyone care about planets
we can't go to?



Answering this question is important, and understanding it is the basis of why we study planets in other solar systems. Some might wonder if studying planets gazillions of miles away are worth the effort considering we have so many problems on Earth. First, not every scientist can be a climatologist or ecologist, and the gap between Earth-based physical science and astronomical science is continually lessening. Learning about far-off worlds can tell us things we never knew about our own planet, maybe to the point of saving humanity. Who knows? Second, it's also important because snazzy new technologies are created out of space research that get passed on to us. Your comfy sneakers and cordless drill came from space research, so studying the Universe has a personal impact on you everyday. Some people might also say it's a waste of money to spend millions of dollars on space programs when people can't get health insurance. Rest assured that out of the entire US gross domestic product, significantly more funds are spent on health. Space programs are a drop in the bucket. For an analysis of where your tax dollar goes, see this chart.

Although one could find more reasons, I think the best reason is, because we simply can!

For a detailed list of NASA technology spinoffs, see this.


You have something on this site that is
copyrighted by me.



Best efforts have been taken to ensure that all copyrights have been respected and credit given where applicable. This site intends to be in full compliance with copyright law and if you find something that may not be, please contact.


Something on this site is incorrect.
How do I contact you to fix it?



Considerable efforts have been made in assembling accurate up-to-date information. I'm not a professional scientist, just the armchair variety, so if you find something to be erroneous, contact with the error and sources of credible documentation.


Fav SCI-FI?


ST:TNG



Return to Top



2009-2014 / exoworld.info \
Site by Degenerate Matter Studios ¤ About | Usage Policy

Support this site through donation.